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Tissue Culture and Improvement of Woody Perennials: An Overview

  • D. J. Durzan
Chapter
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 32)

Abstract

In the United States, we are cutting more forest trees than we grow (4) and in several cases removing more orchards than we plant (65). In both instances breeders are attempting to capture the existing genetic gains for domesticating trees and developing new varieties and cultivars (46, 66, 75, 81, 88, 94 and Zimmerman, this volume). Classical breeding methods, while successful, are slow and costly (12, 58, 67, 93).

Keywords

Tissue Culture Somatic Embryo Somatic Embryogenesis Forest Tree Paper Chemistry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Durzan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PomologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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