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Inelastic Scattering from Biomolecules: Principles and Prospects

  • H. D. Middendorf
Chapter
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 27)

Abstract

The main theme of the present Symposium is the application of neutron scattering to structural molecular biology, and this involves the analysis of diffraction patterns in much the same way as with x rays. It is possible, however, to go beyond this and do something with neutrons that cannot be done with x rays: to energy-analyze the intensity at each scattering angle, in addition to determining its dependence on angle. A well-developed method of structural analysis thus assumes a “spectroscopic dimension,” and in this neutrons are unique.

Keywords

Inelastic Scattering Rotational Diffusion Jump Diffusion Incoherent Scattering Dynamic Structure Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. D. Middendorf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiophysicsUniversity of London King’s CollegeLondonUK

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