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Transportation Users’ Movements in Paris in the 1970s

  • Chester Hartman
Part of the Environment, Development, and Public Policy book series (EDPE)

Abstract

In comparing France with the United States, one is struck by the paucity of citizens’ groups here established to deal with transportation issues. Looking through a list of 180 participants at a 1978 national conference on Transportation’s Role in Neighborhood Revitalization (sponsored by the Conservation Foundation for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration) in which a major topic was “citizen involvement” and whose goal was to “seek advice from citizen leaders and state and local officials,” just one represented group was clearly a citizens’ transportation organization. The other participants were from a range of general-purpose national and local citizens’ organizations (47%); public officials from federal, state and local government transportation agencies (29%); private consultants (10%); and the media (3%).1 The number of local and national citizen-based activist transportation groups in the United States is minuscule. By comparison, a two-week field trip to Paris revealed a plethora of such groups and a long history of successful involvement in influencing various levels of transportation policy and programs.

Keywords

Public Transit Paris Region Public Transportation System Transit User Transportation Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 2.
    David Gurin, “France: Making Ecology Political and Politics Ecological.” Contemporary Crises 3 (1979), 156, 158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 4.
    This account of the 1970–71 movement and of the later transit users’ movement draws from three excellent sources: Eddy Cherki and Dominque Mehl, Les nouveaux embarras de Paris (Paris: Francois Maspero, 1979)Google Scholar
  3. G. Ribeill, P. Bertier, F. Lille, and N. May, Revendications et instances revendicatives en matière de transport urbains (Paris: Secrétariat d’État auprès du Ministre de l’Équipment [Transports], Prospective et Aménagement, 1978)Google Scholar
  4. G. Ribeill and N. May, Rapports sociaux dans les transport urbains et mouvements revendicatifs transports (Paris: Secrétariat d’État auprès du Ministre de l’Équipment [Transport]. Prospective et Aménagement, November, 1976). All three works are excellent analyses of the politics and sociology of social movements.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chester Hartman

There are no affiliations available

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