Fostering Effective Citizen Participation

Lessons from Three Urban Renewal Neighborhoods in The Hague
  • Marc Draisen
Part of the Environment, Development, and Public Policy book series (EDPE)

Abstract

There is no doubt that Dutch and American cultures and political institutions are very different. However, in the field of urban renewal, there have been many important similarities—both procedural and historical. Planning in both countries is conducted essentially at the local level by bureaucrats and members of popularly elected city councils. Physical plans are broadly influenced by policies adopted at the state (provincial) and national levels; regional and national authorities oversee (and in many cases must approve) planning decisions made by municipalities. Finally, most of the money that finances urban renewal stems from the central government and private developers (both profit and nonprofit).

Keywords

Urban Renewal Participatory Process Municipal Government Citizen Participation Dutch Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Draisen

There are no affiliations available

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