Advertisement

A Family-Oriented Supportive Approach to Dialysis and Renal Transplantation in Children

  • Dennis Drotar
  • Mary Ann Ganofsky
  • Sudesh Makker
  • Denise DeMaio

Abstract

Comprehensive pediatric care provided by an interdisciplinary team is often recommended to help families cope with the considerable stresses involved in dialysis and renal transplantation.1 The various functions of comprehensive care include emotional support of families through the course of treatment, attention to the child’s psychosocial adjustment, and facilitation of patient-physician communications. The structure and emphasis of comprehensive care program vary considerably from setting to setting. This report describes the role of one comprehensive care team in aiding family coping and helping families with treatment decisions, with particular reference to renal transplantation.

Keywords

Social Worker Team Member Treatment Team Nurse Clinician Comprehensive Care 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1._Korsch, B. M., Fine, R. N., Grushkin, C. M., and Negrete, V. F. Experiences with children and families during extended hemodialysis and kidney transplantation. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 1971, 625-637.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Drotar, D., and Ganofsky, M. A. Mental health intervention with children and adolescents with end-stage renal disease. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 1976, 7, 181–194.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Drotar, D., Ganofsky, M. A., and Marker, S. Psychosocial intervention in childhood renal failure. Dialysis and Transplantation, 1979, 8, 73–77.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bernstein, D. M. After transplantation—the child’s emotional reactions. American Journal of Psychiatry, 1971, 127, 1189–1193.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Parsons, T., and Fox, R. Illness, therapy, and the modern American family. Journal of Social Issues, 1951, 31-44.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Calland, C. Iatrogenic problems in end-stage renal failure. New England Journal of Medicine, 1972, 287, 334–336.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Eisendrath, R.M., Topor, M., Misfeldt, C., and Jessiman, A. G. Service meetings in a renal transplant unit: An unused adjunct to total patient care. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 1970, 1, 53–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Additional References

  1. Drotar, D. The treatment of a severe anxiety reaction in an adolescent boy following renal transplantation. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 1975, 14, 451–461.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Korsch, B. M., Negrete, V. F., Gardner, J. E., Weinstock, C. L., Mercer, A. S., Grushkin, C. M., and Fine, R. N. Kidney transplantation in children. Journal of Pediatrics, 1973, 84, 339–408.Google Scholar
  3. Reinhart, J. B. The doctor’s dilemma: Whether or not to recommend continuous renal dialysis or renal transplantation for the child with end-stage renal disease. Journal of Pediatrics, 1970, 77, 505–506.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. VanLeewen, J. J., and Matthews, D. E. Comprehensive mental health care on a pediatric dialysis-transplantation program. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 1975, 113, 959–962.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Drotar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary Ann Ganofsky
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sudesh Makker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Denise DeMaio
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Case Western Reserve Medical SchoolClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Rainbow Babies and Childrens HospitalClevelandUSA

Personalised recommendations