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Pubertal Change and Cognition

  • Anne C. Petersen

Abstract

Early adolescence, the stage of life during which puberty takes place, is a time of some very interesting changes in cognition. It is the time for the onset of the final stage in Piaget’s (Inhelder and Piaget, 1958) conceptualization of cognitive development, a stage characterized by the development of the capacity for abstract thinking, or formal operational thought. While not all early adolescents, or even adults, manifest such thinking (Elkind, 1974), early adolescence is a time when some young people first manifest abstract thinking.

Keywords

Early Adolescence Head Circumference Cognitive Change Spatial Ability Pubertal Timing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne C. Petersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Individual and Family Studies, College of Human DevelopmentThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUSA

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