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Performance of Silane Coupling Agents

  • Edwin P. Plueddemann

Abstract

The need for coupling agents was recognized in 1940 when glass fibers were first used as reinforcements in organic resins. Specific strength-to-weight ratios of dry glass-resin composites were very favorable, but the laminates lost much of their strength during prolonged exposure to moisture. Since unsaturated polyester resins were the most common organic matrix material, various unsaturated compounds of silicon and other elements were tested as coupling agents. Only unsaturated silanes and methacrylato-chrome complexes (DuPont Volan®) have reached commercial importance.

Keywords

Flexural Strength Coupling Agent Silane Coupling Agent Unsaturated Polyester Peel Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin P. Plueddemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Dow Corning CorporationMidlandUSA

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