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Chemistry of Silane Coupling Agents

  • Edwin P. Plueddemann

Abstract

The “coupling” mechanism of organofunctional silanes depends on a stable link between the organofunctional group (Y) and hydrolyzable groups (X) in compounds of the structure X3SiRY. The organofunctional groups (Y) are chosen for reactivity or compatibility with the polymer while the hydrolyzable groups (X) are merely intermediates in formation of silanol groups for bonding to mineral surfaces.

Keywords

Coupling Agent Silane Coupling Agent Interpenetrate Polymer Network Unsaturated Polyester Glyceryl Ether 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin P. Plueddemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Dow Corning CorporationMidlandUSA

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