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Vietnam and 2,4,5-T

  • Alastair Hay
Chapter
Part of the Disaster Research in Practice book series (DRP)

Abstract

“Saddle up, Cowboys!” With this command from Lieutenant Colonel Jack Longhorne, lead pilot in a formation of five C-123 “Providers,” the “Ranch Hands” of the 12th Special Operations Squadron prepared to rein into action. With the grace of hawks, the seemingly lumbering C-123’s plummeted 3500 feet in less than a minute to level off just above the jungle canopy which shrouds the enemy-infested southernmost portion of the Mekong Delta. The spray jets were opened and defoliant spewed forth in another operation to dispense “herbicides, in use since 1962, (which) are non-toxic, non-corrosive and not harmful to human and animal life.”1

Keywords

Spina Bifida Phenoxy Herbicide Soft Tissue Cancer Midwest Research Institute Lieutenant Colonel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alastair Hay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical PathologyThe University of LeedsLeedsEngland

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