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Toxicology of Dioxins

  • Alastair Hay
Chapter
Part of the Disaster Research in Practice book series (DRP)

Abstract

Like all chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, the tetrachlorinated isomer 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is stable to heat, acids, and alkali. TCDD is virtually insoluble in water (2 × 10−4 ppm) only slightly soluble in fats (44 ppm in lard oil), and more soluble in hydrocarbons (570 ppm in benzene), and at its most soluble in chlorinated organic solvents (1400 ppm in ortho-dichlorobenzene).1

Keywords

Cholic Acid Baby Hamster Kidney Butyl Ester Apply Pharmacology Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alastair Hay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical PathologyThe University of LeedsLeedsEngland

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