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Pollution pp 346-356 | Cite as

Land Disposal of Septage (Septic Tank Pumpings)

  • J. J. Kolega
  • A. W. Dewey
  • R. L. Leonard
  • B. J. Cosenza
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 2)

Abstract

Household sewage systems involving the disposal of septic tank pumpings, namely septage, are used on a world-wide basis. The system commonly encountered in the United States is a septic tank combined with a subsurface disposal field. In some areas of the country, a cesspool or dry well may be used in place of the septic tank, but this is not the general practice. Over a period of time, a septic tank or cesspool develops an accumulation of floating and settleable solids, along with scum. These solids will build up to a point where they must be removed. If this is not done, sewage flow into the septic tank will be blocked or the subsurface disposal field will become plugged from the excess solids discharge. In the first instance, the homeowner experiences an inconvenience requiring immediate attention. For the second situation, corrective action is required that may involve a renewal of the subsurface disposal field. The corrective measure, when required, can be a major one that is expensive to the homeowner.

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Fecal Coliform Sewage Treatment Plant Septic Tank Poultry Manure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. J. Kolega
    • 1
  • A. W. Dewey
    • 1
  • R. L. Leonard
    • 1
  • B. J. Cosenza
    • 1
  1. 1.Storrs Agricultural Experiment StationUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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