Schizophrenia pp 137-161 | Cite as

Treatments

General Principles
  • John S. Strauss
  • William T. CarpenterJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Optimal treatment requires a clear identification of the disorder being treated and a comprehensive understanding of the sick person and his or her environment. But the enigmatic nature of schizophrenia makes this ideal difficult to realize. Understanding the illness, the setting in which it occurs, and the effects on the individual, requires time and skill. Even when such understanding is achieved, it does not assure decisive therapeutic intervention.

Keywords

Schizophrenic Patient Antipsychotic Medication Symptom Reduction Chronic Patient Psychotic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Recommended Reading

  1. Cancro, R., Fox, N., and Shapiro, L. E. (eds.). Strategic intervention in schizophrenia. New York: Behavioral Publications, 1974.Google Scholar
  2. Gunderson, J. Individual psychotherapy. In: Disorders of the schizophrenic syndrome, Bellak, L. (ed.). New York: Basic Books, 1979, 364–398.Google Scholar
  3. Lipton, M. A., and Burnett, G. B. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia. In: Disorders of the schizophrenic syndrome, Bellak, L. (Ed.). New York: Basic Books, 1979, 320–352.Google Scholar
  4. Mendel, W. M. Schizophrenia: The experience and its treatment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc., 1976.Google Scholar
  5. Schulz, C. G., and Kilgalen, R. K. Case studies in schizophrenia. New York: Basic Books, 1969.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Levy, S. T., McGlashan, T. H., and Carpenter, W. T., Jr. Integration and sealing-over as recovery styles from acute psychosis: Metapsychological and dynamic concepts. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 1975, 161: 307–312.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    McGlashan, T. H., and Carpenter, W. T., Jr. Does attitude towards psychosis relate to outcome? American Journal of Psychiatry, in press.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jackson, H. Remarks on evolution and dissolution of the nervous system. Journal of Mental Science, 1887, 33: 25–48.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Strauss, J. S., Kokes, R. F., Ritzler, B. A., Harder, D. W., and Vanord, A. Patterns of disorder in first admission psychiatric patients. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 1978, 166(9): 611–625.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Carpenter, W. T., Jr., and Heinrichs, D. W. Treatment of relevant subtypes of schizophrenia. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, in press.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bachrach, L. L. Planning mental health services for chronic patients. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 1979, 30: 387–393.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Clausen, J. The impact of mental illness: A 20-year follow-up. In: Life history research in psychopathology, vol. 4, Wirt, R. D., Winokur, G., and Roff, M. (eds.). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1976, 270–289.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Paul, G. L. Comprehensive psychosocial treatment: Beyond traditional psychotherapy. In: Psychotherapy of schizophrenia, Strauss, J. S. et al. (eds.). New York: Plenum, 1980.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Liberman, R. P., Wallace, C. J., Vaughn, C. E., Snyder, K. S., and Rust, C. Social and family factors in the course of schizophrenia: Towards an interpersonal problem-solving therapy for schizophrenics and their families. In: Psychotherapy of schizophrenia, Strauss, J. S. et al. (eds.). New York: Plenum, 1980.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Anthony, W. Psychological rehabilitation: A concept in need of a method. American Psychologist, 1977, 658–662.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Carpenter, W. T., Jr., McGlashan, T. H., and Strauss, J. S. The treatment of acute schizophrenia without drugs: An investigation of some current assumptions. American Journal of Psychiatry, 1977, 134: 14–20.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Wynne, L. C, Toohey, M. L., and Doane, J. Family studies. In: Disorders of the schizophrenic syndrome, Bellak, L. (ed.). New York: Basic Books, 1979, 264–288.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Leff, J. P. Schizophrenia and sensitivity to the family environment. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 1976, 2: 566–574.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Scott, R. D. Closure in family relationships and the first official diagnosis. In: Schizophrenia 75: Psychotherapy, family studies, research, Jorstad, J., and Ugelstad, E. (eds.). Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1976, 265–281.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Strauss, J. S., and Frader, M. A. Justifying intensive psychotherapy for schizophrenia in a community treatment center. In: Schizophrenia 75: Psychotherapy, family studies, research, Jorstad, J. & Ugelstad, E. (eds.). Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1976.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Bleuler, M. The long-term course of the schizophrenic psychoses. Psychological Medicine, 1974, 4: 244–254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. Strauss
    • 1
  • William T. CarpenterJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Yale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Maryland Psychiatric Research CenterUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

Personalised recommendations