Schizophrenia pp 115-136 | Cite as

Etiologies of Schizophrenia

Psychological and Social
  • John S. Strauss
  • William T. CarpenterJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

The interactive developmental model described in Chapter 2 involves psychological and social factors as well as biochemical, psychophysiological, and genetic characteristics. All are necessary for an integrated concept of schizophrenia. This chapter will focus on the four major types of psychosocial characteristics for which there is appreciable evidence of etiological importance in schizophrenia: early psychosocial development, family characteristics, the broader social environment, and stressful life events.

Keywords

Social Class Schizophrenic Patient Stressful Life Event Family Environment Societal Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. Strauss
    • 1
  • William T. CarpenterJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Yale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Maryland Psychiatric Research CenterUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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