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The Extent of the Problem

Epidemiology of Schizophrenia
  • John S. Strauss
  • William T. CarpenterJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Epidemiology in mental health focuses on assessing the amount and distribution of mental disorders in the population. Such information provides the means for improving prevention and treatment and serves as a basis for administrative planning.1 The epidemiologist also examines associations between population characteristics and disorders that may clarify the origins of mental disorders or aid in identifying homogeneous groups of patients. This chapter will describe epidemiological findings in schizophrenia that delineate the extent of the problem and provide information relevant to etiology and pathogenesis from an epidemiological perspective.

Keywords

Schizophrenic Patient Epidemiological Finding Smallpox Vaccine Epidemiological Perspective Administrative Planning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Recommended ReadingS

  1. Babigian, H. M. Schizophrenia: Epidemiology. In: Comprehensive textbook of psychiatry, Vol. 3, Kaplan, H. I., Freedman, A. M., and Sadock, B. J. (eds.). Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. Report of the Task Panel on Nature and Scope of the Problems. Report of the President’s Commission on Mental Health, Vol. 2, 1978, 1–138.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. Strauss
    • 1
  • William T. CarpenterJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Yale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Maryland Psychiatric Research CenterUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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