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Introduction

  • Jay D. Humphrey
  • Sherry L. Delange
Chapter

Abstract

Biology is the study of living things; mechanics is the study of motions and the applied loads that cause them. Biomechanics can be defined, therefore, as the study of the motions experienced by living things in response to applied loads. Herein, however, we consider that biomechanics is the development, extension, and application of mechanics for the purposes of understanding better the influence of mechanical loads on the structure, properties, and function of living things. Thus, the domain of biomechanics is very broad. It includes, among many other things, studying the effects of wind loads or gravity on the growth of plants, the mechanical properties of foodstuffs, the flight of birds, the drag-reducing properties of the skin of dolphins, and human athletic performance. Additionally, biomechanics addresses many issues of health as well as disease, injury, and their treatment in both humans and animals. This shall be our primary motivation herein; thus, it is easy to see that biomechanics is fundamental to the rapidly growing field of biomedical engineering.

Keywords

Applied Load Intermediate Filament Stress Fiber Internal Force Solid Mechanic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay D. Humphrey
    • 1
  • Sherry L. Delange
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical Engineering and M. E. DeBakey InstituteTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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