Social Intelligence and the Development of Communicative Competence

  • Louise Cherry Wilkinson
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we consider social intelligence and its relationship to communicative competence. We share the position held by a substantial and growing number of psychologists that the construct of intelligence, as it has been defined and used, has been of limited utility and questionable validity in its ability to predict the ways in which individuals solve problems in everyday situations. It is necessary to develop and use an alternative construct of intelligence, which would guide research and practice, and we propose the term social intelligence to refer to the range of human competencies involved in functionally appropriate interpersonal behaviors. The ability to communicate effectively in social situations, communicative competence,is central to our conception of social intelligence.

Keywords

Social Competence Social Intelligence Communicative Competence Intelligent Behavior Communicative Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Cherry Wilkinson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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