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Looking Smart

The Relationship between Affect and Intelligence in Infancy
  • Jeannette Haviland

Abstract

Without being wholly conscious of it, parents, pediatricians, and particularly psychologists have used facial expression to infer the existence and development of intelligence. We use facial expression or “affect” to denote consciousness, interest, surprise, intention, fear, or frustration; then we use these states of emotions to determine motivation, knowledge, and ability. This may surprise some readers, since we claim to be looking at behavior to determine motivation, knowledge, and ability. By behavior we usually mean actions accomplished—“grasped the block,” “looked under the pillow,” “turned away.” Awareness of these actions accomplished seems to block awareness of the affect accompanying, preceding, substituting for, or following the action, even though we use affect to interpret the action.

Keywords

Facial Expression Autistic Child Affective Response Motor Scale Affect Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeannette Haviland
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyRutgers—The State UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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