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Dissociative Disorders in Children and Adolescents

  • Nancy L. Hornstein

Abstract

The clinical evolution of the recognition and treatment of dissociative disorders occurring during childhood and adolescence owes a debt of gratitude to several bodies of research and clinical literature that have accumulated over the last two decades, including posttraumatic stress, the psychological sequelae of trauma and child abuse, child development, and the study of dissociative disorders in adults. The complexities of symptomatic presentation and underlying deficits that accompany overt “dissociation” are perhaps nowhere as remarkable as they are during the process of ongoing development in children. The evolution of knowledge in these overlapping areas of investigation has created a framework for the conceptualization and recognition of childhood dissociative disorders among those suffering from the psychological sequelae of trauma.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Childhood Sexual Abuse Dissociative Experience Dissociative Symptom Psychological Sequela 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy L. Hornstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Child DivisionUniversity of Illinois at Chicago and Institute for Juvenile ResearchChicagoUSA

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