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Clinical Aspects of Sadistic Ritual Abuse

  • David K. Sakheim

Abstract

In recent years, therapists have been confronted with thousands of cases in which both children and adults are alleging horrendous abuse at the hands of satanic cults. These patients have been labeled as “ritually abused” and/or “satanic cult survivors.”1 How to make sense of the memories of atrocities described by such individuals has resulted in tremendous controversy within the field. Unfortunately, both clinicians and researchers tend to take strong emotionally based positions, despite the absence of sufficient empirical data to do so in an educated fashion. This chapter is an attempt to discuss and clarify some of the issues that arise in this area and to give an overview of what is currently known in the field.

Keywords

Child Abuse False Memory Organize Crime Group Trauma Survivor Delusional Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • David K. Sakheim
    • 1
  1. 1.South WindsorUSA

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