Art and the Dissociative Paracosm

Uncommon Realities
  • Barry M. Cohen

Abstract

During the last decade, increasing attention has been given to the long-term sequelae of incestuous and sadistic early childhood abuse and, more specifically, the dissociative symptomatology that results (e.g., Courtois, 1988; Herman, 1992; Kluft, 1985, 1990; Loewenstein, 1991; McCann & Pearlman, 1990; Putnam, 1989; Ross, 1989). A body of research has grown to complement the observations of practitioners and their eminent predecessors, such as Janet and Prince, regarding the variform trauma in young children and the development of chronic posttraumatic dissociation (Boon & Draijer, 1993; Herman, Perry, & van der Kolk, 1989; Loewenstein, 1993; Putnam, 1991).

Keywords

Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Cassette Record Dissociative Identity Disorder Verbal Metaphor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry M. Cohen
    • 1
  1. 1.AlexandriaUSA

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