Memory Processing and the Healing Experience

  • Roberta G. Sachs
  • Judith A. Peterson

Abstract

The mental health field is in the midst of a paradigm shift. The position that Freud in 1898 was unable to sustain when he thought that the roots of mental illness were related to sexual abuse is currently being advanced by a number of researchers (van der Kolk, 1987; van der Kolk & van der Hart, 1991; van der Kolk-Perry,& Herman, 1991; Jacobsen, Koehler, & Jones-Brown, 1987; Herman, 1992; Boon & Draijer, 1993). They and others in our field are finding that this paradigm shift is occurring as research appears to link many of the symptoms of mental illness with past or present traumatic symptoms and with dysfunctional events in the lives of clients. Originally Freud was not believed. Yet, when van der Kolk (1991) asked Kernberg about the incidence of sexual abuse in the original population of clients labeled as borderline, the percentage was very high. Van der Kolk (1993) estimated that 15% of the population of the United States suffers from symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. Today, therapists are faced with many clients who present symptomotology resulting from trauma in childhood or adulthood.

Keywords

Child Sexual Abuse Memory Processing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Cognitive Restructuring Healing Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberta G. Sachs
    • 1
  • Judith A. Peterson
    • 2
  1. 1.Highland Park Psychological ResourcesHighland ParkUSA
  2. 2.Phoenix Counseling, Consulting, and Forensic ServicesHoustonUSA

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