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Overt-Covert Dissociation and Hypnotic Ego State Therapy

  • John G. Watkins
  • Helen H. Watkins

Abstract

During the past decade, the psychological process of dissociation has received an increasing amount of attention as witnessed by the contributions in this volume. However, the focus has been largely on its severe ramifications evidenced in amnesia and multiple personality disorder (MPD). Such a focus has resulted in an emphasis on its pathological effects as found in severe mental illness to the neglect of its more normal manifestations as an adaptive defense. This more normal aspect of dissociation is demonstrated in many behavioral, adjustment problems and in various neurotic and psychosomatic reactions.

Keywords

Internal Dialogue Internal Behavior Multiple Personality Dissociative Identity Disorder State Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Watkins
    • 1
  • Helen H. Watkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MontanaMissoulaUSA

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