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Psychodynamic Psychotherapy of Dissociative Identity Disorder

  • Peter M. Barach
  • Christine M. Comstock

Abstract

The tools of psychodynamic therapy serve the purpose of bringing disparate elements of the psyche together. These tools originate from a model of the psyche that highlights the symptomatic properties of unresolved and unconscious conflicts, and the tools help to bring these conflicts to awareness so that the patient may confront them. The psychodynamic approach aims to “give [the patient’s] ego back its mastery over lost provinces of his mental life” (Freud, 1969, p. 30) and is well suited for the treatment of dissociative identity disorder (DID).

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Multiple Personality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Barach
    • 1
  • Christine M. Comstock
    • 1
  1. 1.Horizons Counseling Services, Inc.ClevelandUSA

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