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Dissociative Amnesia and Dissociative Fugue

  • Richard J. Loewenstein

Abstract

In 1991, I published a comprehensive review of dissociative (psychogenic) amnesia (DA) and dissociative (psychogenic) fugue (DF), emphasizing the relationship of these conditions to overwhelming psychological trauma (Loewenstein, 1991b). Since the publication of that work, several additional studies have been published that support the basic premises of that review. Also, I have recently published a review of treatment of dissociative amnesia and dissociative fugue (Loewenstein, 1995). In addition, however, there has arisen an intense public and academic controversy about the validity of delayed adult recollections of childhood traumatic events, particularly those for which the individual reports prior amnesia (Loftus, 1993). Further, critics of the dissociation-trauma model have questioned whether DA for traumatic events ever occurs (McHugh, 1992). This chapter will update the prior review. In addition, however, I will discuss issues in the current controversy over the delayed recollection of traumatic events.

Keywords

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Autobiographical Memory Psychiatric Clinic Vietnam Veteran Dissociative Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Loewenstein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dissociative Disorders Service LineSheppard Pratt Health SystemsBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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