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The Psychological Assessment of Dissociation

  • Marlene Steinberg

Abstract

The five dissociative disorders included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) [dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder (multiple personality disorder), and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS)] are characterized by disturbances in the integrative functions of memory, consciousness, and/ or identity (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). In recent years, mental health professionals and researchers have found that dissociative disorders occur frequently in psychiatric patients, and comprise as much as 10% of inpatient psychiatric populations (Bliss & Jeppsen, 1985). Moderate-to-severe dissociative symptoms are also common in patients with other psychiatric disorders, particularly the anxiety disorders (including posttraumatic stress disorder), mood disorders, eating disorders, and borderline personality disorder (Coons, 1984; Fink, 1991; Horevitz & Braun, 1984; Kluft, 1987c; Putnam, Guroff, Silberman, Barban, & Post, 1986; Schultz, Braun, & Kluft, 1989; Torem, 1986; Steinberg, 1995).

Keywords

Eating Disorder Personality Disorder Psychological Assessment Borderline Personality Disorder Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marlene Steinberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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