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History, Phenomenology, and Epidemiology of Dissociation

  • Colin A. Ross

Abstract

The dissociative disorders have a unique history within psychology and psychiatry. Our understanding of this history, particularly the contributions of Pierre Janet in the nineteenth century (Ellenberger, 1970; Nemiah, 1989; Putnam, 1989; Ross, 1989; van der Hart & Friedman, 1989), has shifted radically since 1980. Intertwined with this development, a detailed, replicated description of the phenomenology of dissociation has been built up, based primarily on research in North America (North, Ryall, Ricci, & Wetzel, 1993), with significant contributions from the Netherlands & Belgium (Boon & Draijer, 1993; Vanderlinden, 1993). A considerable amount of work has been done on the epidemiology of dissociation within clinical populations and a lesser amount among college students (Frischholtz et al., 1990; Ross, Ryan, Anderson, Ross, & Hardy, 1989e; Ross, Ryan, Voigt, & Eide, 1990c; Sanders, McRoberts, & Tollefson, 1989). One general population survey of dissociation has been completed in North America (Ross, 1991; Ross, Joshi, and Currie, 1990a, 1991b).

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Eating Disorder Personality Disorder Childhood Trauma Borderline Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin A. Ross
    • 1
  1. 1.Charter Behavioral Health System of DallasDissociative Disorders UnitPlanoUSA

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