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Physiological Hazards

  • Frederick J. Edeskuty
  • Walter F. Stewart
Part of the The International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

There are several mechanisms by which contact of cryogenic fluids with a person can present a physiological hazard. The most obvious of these mechanisms is that the low temperature can cause freezing of living tissue. Also, in the case of cryogens other than oxygen, the large expansion that occurs upon evaporation and warming to ambient temperature can result in dilution of the oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere to the point where it cannot support life. In the case of a few cryogens, toxicity can also be a problem, but, fortunately, these are not frequently encountered.

Keywords

Body Core Temperature Threshold Limit Value Cold Damage Governmental Industrial Hygienist Cryogenic Fluid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick J. Edeskuty
    • 1
  • Walter F. Stewart
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National Laboratory (Retired)Los AlamosUSA

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