Safety Problems Needing Further Investigation

  • Frederick J. Edeskuty
  • Walter F. Stewart
Part of the The International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

Safety is not an exact science but an ongoing process of improving, developing, and applying new knowledge. As new projects stretch the frontiers of technology (involving new or different experimentation and testing), new safety needs will be disclosed. This occurred, for example, when the decision was made to use liquid hydrogen as a rocket fuel and again when slush hydrogen was planned for use in the National Aero-Space Plane. Each new project involves safety needs that have many features in common with those of other projects, but usually it has needs unique to that specific project.

Keywords

Hydrogen Storage Safety Problem Liquid Hydrogen National Fire Protection Association Storage Vessel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick J. Edeskuty
    • 1
  • Walter F. Stewart
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National Laboratory (Retired)Los AlamosUSA

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