Experiencing Japanese Gardens

Sensory Information and Behavior
  • Ryuzo Ohno
  • Tomohiro Hata
  • Miki Kondo

Abstract

Japanese circuit-style gardens have long been appreciated for their sequential scenes of beautiful landscapes. It has often been mentioned that Japanese gardens have been designed so as to control visitors’ experience, particularly the vistas, as they move along the garden paths (e. g., Hall, 1970). If we can learn from these sophisticated skills of landscape design, we could naturally direct people’s attention to something we want to be viewed (e. g., signs in urban streets) without using harsh colors and brutal forms. With some exceptions (Miyagishi & Zaino, 1992), the relation between the physical arrangements and visitors’ behavior in the garden, however, has never been analyzed based on objective data.

Keywords

Observation Point Sensory Information Spatial Volume Landscape Design Garden Path 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryuzo Ohno
    • 1
  • Tomohiro Hata
    • 1
  • Miki Kondo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Built EnvironmentTokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohama-shiJapan

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