Introduction

  • Seymour Wapner
  • Jack Demick
  • Takiji Yamamoto
  • Takashi Takahashi

Abstract

This volume is based on an ongoing collaboration of scientists from Japan and the United States through a series of seminars over the past 15 years. The First Japan United States Seminar, “Interaction Processes Between Human Behavior and Environment,” took place in Tokyo on September 24–27,1980. In a preface to the report on the proceedings of the seminar, Hagino (1981) described its origins as follows

Keywords

Urban Renewal Sociocultural Aspect Urban Public Space Comprehensive High School Japanese Garden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seymour Wapner
    • 1
  • Jack Demick
    • 2
  • Takiji Yamamoto
    • 3
  • Takashi Takahashi
    • 4
  1. 1.Heinz Werner InstituteClark UniversityWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologySuffolk UniversityBostonUSA
  3. 3.The Japanese Institute of Health PsychologyChiyoda-Ku, TokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of ArchitectureUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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