Nutrition, Disability, and Health in the Older Population

  • Paula A. Quatromoni
  • Barbara E. Millen
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

The aging of the U.S. population, where one in eight persons is aged 65 or older, has focused national attention on the development of a continuum of health services which promote healthy aging. While the majority of American elders perceive themselves to be in good to excellent health (Institute of Medicine, 1992; Morley, 1986; Surgeon General’s Workshop on Health Promotion and Aging, 1988; U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging et al., 1991), more than four out of five people age 65 and older have at least one chronic disease. Older persons also experience a heavier disease burden. Over half of the older population has two or more coexisting, chronic health problems (U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging et al., 1991). As well, 7–10 of the years lived after age 65 will include significant disability and major health complaints, including pain and discomfort or reduced function in activities of daily living (Surgeon General’s Workshop on Health Promotion and Aging, 1988; Institute of Medicine, 1992). Other serious health-related problems, such as malnutrition, dementia, visual and hearing impairments, and incontinence further impact on functional independence and the quality of daily living. Therefore, it is important to recognize and promote preventive health strategies which improve the management of chronic diseases and reduce the accompanying discomfort and disability in older people.

Keywords

Nutrition Education Nutritional Risk Food Stamp Nutrition Program Recommended Dietary Allowance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula A. Quatromoni
    • 1
  • Barbara E. Millen
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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