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Phytochrome Overexpression and Cold Hardiness in Transgenic Populus

  • O. Junttila
  • J. E. Olsen
  • J. Nilsen
  • I. Martinussen
  • T. Moritz
  • M. Eriksson
  • O. Olsson
  • G. Sandberg

Abstract

Photoperiodic effects on woody plants were reported already by Gardner and Allard in 1923 and comprehensive studies during the ’50s confirmed the role of photoperiod as an important environmental regulator of growth and growth cessation in many northern tree species (Nitsch, 1957; Wareing, 1956). In woody plants cessation of apical growth is a prerequisite for cold acclimation (Weiser, 1970) and photoperiod, as a factor controlling growth cessation, is therefore an important environmental signal for initiation of cold acclimation. In many cases a proper timing of acclimation and deacclimation, in respect to annual variation of temperature conditions, is more critical for winter survival than the maximum level of frost hardiness. Also in such coniferous species where cessation of apical growth is not controlled by photoperiod, short photoperiod is necessary for good cold acclimation, low temperature causes no or only a limited level of hardiness if combined with long day conditions (Schwarz, 1970; Aronsson, 1975; Christersson, 1978; Jonsson et al., 1981). Thus, photoperiod may have both an indirect, through induction of growth cessation, and a more direct influence on cold acclimation in woody plants.

Keywords

Cold Acclimation Cold Hardiness Short Photoperiod Photoperiodic Response Growth Cessation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Junttila
    • 1
  • J. E. Olsen
    • 1
  • J. Nilsen
    • 1
  • I. Martinussen
    • 1
  • T. Moritz
    • 2
  • M. Eriksson
    • 2
  • O. Olsson
    • 2
  • G. Sandberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant Physiology and MicrobiologyUniversity of TromsøTromsøNorway
  2. 2.Department of Forest Genetics and Plant PhysiologyAgricultural University of SwedenUmeåSweden

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