Alkaloids of Turf-Type Fine Fescue (Festuca Sp.)

  • Q. Yue
  • S. Logendra
  • A. Freehoff
  • M. D. Richardson

Abstract

Endophytes of the tribe Balansieae form a symbiotic relationship with many coolseason grasses, including several Festuca sp. (Bacon and De Battista, 1990). These fungus-grass associations have been the focus of much attention since their identification in pasture cultivars of tall fescue and perennial ryegrass as the causal agent of animal toxicoses (Stuedemann and Hoveland, 1988). The fine leaf fescues include Chewings fescue (Festuca rubra var. commutata), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra spp. rubra), hard fescue (Festuca ovine spp. duriuscula) and blue fescue (Festuca ovine spp. ovine). Because of the limited utilization of the fine fescues as pasture grasses, the fungal endophytes of these species have not been studied to the extent of tall fescue and perennial ryegrass. However, these grasses are widely used for amenity purposes and are considered excellent low-maintenance grasses (Juska et al., 1955). The following study is part of a long-term project examining these grasses and their natural endophytes. The principal focus of this research was to assess the distribution and content of ergopeptine alkaloids and peramine in several endophyte-infected grasses. Tall fescue was used as a positive control species for ergot alkaloid analysis.

Keywords

Tall Fescue Perennial Ryegrass Fungal Endophyte Kentucky Bluegrass Endophyte Infected Tall Fescue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bacon, C. W., and J. P. De Battista. 1990. Endophytic fungi of grasses. In Handbook of Applied Mycology, Vo/ 1, Soils and Plant, D. K. Arora, Ed.: Marcel Dekker: New York.Google Scholar
  2. Hill, N.S., G.E. Rottinghaus, C. S. Agee, and L. M. Schultz. 1993. Simplified sample preparation for HPLC analysis of ergovaline in tall fescue. Crop Sci. 33: 331–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Juska, F. V., J. Tyson, and C. M. Harrison. 1955. The competitive relationships of Merion Kentucky Bluegrass as influenced by various mixtures, cutting height, and levels of nitrogen. Agron. J. 47: 513–518.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Porter, J. K., C. W. Bacon, R. D. Plattner, and R. F. Arrendale. 1987. Ergot peptide alkaloid spectra of Clavicepsinfected tall fescue, wheat, and barley. J. Agric. Food Chem. 35: 359–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Stuedemann, J. A., and C. S. Hoveland. 1988. Fescue endophyte: History and impact on animal agriculture. J. Product. Agric. 1: 39–44.Google Scholar
  6. Tapper, B. A., D. D. Rowan, and G. C. M. Latch. 1989. Detection and measurement of the alkaloid peramine in endophyte-infected grasses. J. Chromat. 463: 133–138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. White, J. F., Jr., and C. R. Camp. 1995. A study of water relations of Epichloe emarilans White, an endophyte of the grass Agrostis hiemelis ( Walt.) B.S.P. Symbiosis 18: 15–25.Google Scholar
  8. White, J. F., Jr., and D. R. Huff. 1996. Endophyte-host associations in grasses. XXIV. Some evidence to support the occurrence of endophyte microspecies complexes centered around sexually-reproducing species of Epichloe. Symbiosis 20: 219–227.Google Scholar
  9. Yates, S. G., and R. G. Powell. 1988. Analysis of ergopeptine alkaloids in endophyte infected tall fescue. J. Agric. Food Chem. 36: 337–340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Q. Yue
    • 1
  • S. Logendra
    • 1
  • A. Freehoff
    • 1
  • M. D. Richardson
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Turfgrass ScienceRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

Personalised recommendations