The Evaluation and Use of Endophytes for Pasture Improvement

  • Lester R. Fletcher
  • H. Sydney Easton

Abstract

Forage plant improvement has been achieved through plant and family selection, leading to the identification and multiplication of genetically superior individuals (Pederson and Sleper, 1993). Objectives of pasture improvement have included higher and more reliable annual and seasonal herbage production, and also such factors as reduction or elimination of antiquality factors and improved tolerance or resistance to diseases and pests. Breeders have pursued two strategies with regard to edaphic stress. Usually they have sought a broad adaptability, but in some cases have sought adaptation to defined environmental niches, particularly if it is perceived that tolerance of stress is negatively correlated with productivity in its absence. Forage quality, understood in terms of ability to deliver digestible mineral and organic nutrients to the grazing animal, is an objective of growing importance.

Keywords

Endophytic Fungus Tall Fescue Perennial Ryegrass Endophyte Infection Meadow Fescue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lester R. Fletcher
    • 1
  • H. Sydney Easton
    • 2
  1. 1.AgResearch GrasslandsLincolnNew Zealand
  2. 2.AgResearch Grasslands, Palmerston NorthPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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