Involvement of Neotyphodium Coenophialum in Phosphorus Uptake by Tall Fescue (Festuca Arundinacea Schreb.)

  • D. P. Malinowski
  • D. P. Belesky
  • V. C. Baligar
  • J. M. Fedders

Abstract

Infection of cool-season grasses by clavicipitaceous endophytes usually results in increased tolerance to herbivory and environmental stresses (Latch, 1993; Bacon, 1993). Endophyte-related responses of tall fescue have focused upon nitrogen, since this element is involved in the biosynthesis of ergot and loline alkaloids (Lyons et al., 1990; Arechavaleta et al, 1992). Recent research with endophyte-infected tall fescue suggests an involvement of N. coenophialum (Morgan-Jones & Gams) Glenn, Bacon & Hanlin on phosphorus dynamics in plants (Azevedo, 1993). Although a positive influence of endophytes on root DM was reported by numerous authors (Latch et al., 1985; De Battista et al., 1990), the effect of infection on the rhizosphere of grasses is not well understood. The objective of this experiment was to determine the influence of endophyte on tall fescue phosphorus uptake from an acid, high aluminum content soil. Results of this study should help us determine the mechanisms involved in tolerance of endophyte-infected grasses to conditions of mineral nutrient stress.

Keywords

Endophytic Fungus Tall Fescue Ergot Alkaloid Specific Root Length Endophyte Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. P. Malinowski
    • 1
  • D. P. Belesky
    • 1
  • V. C. Baligar
    • 1
  • J. M. Fedders
    • 1
  1. 1.Appalachian Soil and Water Conservation Research LaboratoryUSDA-ARSBeaverUSA

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