Consequences of Endophyte-Infected Grasses on Plant Biodiversity

  • Keith Clay

Abstract

The numbers of endophyte-infected grasses are greater now than at any time in history. The increase results primarily from breeding and disseminating endophyte-infected species of Festuca and Lolium (Bacon and Siegel, 1988; Funk et al., 1994). Alteration of grasslands, introduction of non-native species and changed grazing patterns also contribute to the spread of infected species. Over 15 million hectares of highly infected tall fescue (F. arundinacea) have been planted in the eastern US alone (Ball et al., 1993, Coley et al., 1995). It is reasonable to assume that increases in endophyte-infected grasses may have significant consequences on many plant communities.

Keywords

Endophytic Fungus White Clover Tall Fescue Perennial Ryegrass Fungal Endophyte 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Clay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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