Exploring Parallels between Quaker Beliefs and Systems Theory

  • Misha Hebel-Holehouse

Abstract

The observation that there are parallels between the Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) beliefs and systems concepts originates from research into performance measurement as undertaken in four very different case studies and documented elsewhere (Hebel, 1996). One of these studies looked at the Quaker business method and consequently the Societies decision making process. On the surface the religious faith and practice of Friends (a name often used by Quakers about Quakers) appeared to have little in common with systems thinking and application but this is not so. The two groups share language and concepts—holism, purpose, emergence for instance—and from this it can be argued that given the 300 year sustainability of the Religious Society of Friends, systems thinking may also offer a route to maintaining symmetry at both a range of levels.

Keywords

System Concept System Thinking Religious Faith Business Meeting Sociological Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Misha Hebel-Holehouse
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of System ScienceCity UniversityLondonUK

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