Evaluation of Outcome Effects

  • Louise Margaret Smith
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The family support program was developed partly in response to recommendations about the design of traumatic brain injury (TBI) services suggested in the literature. First, the literature reviewed suggests that there is a need for psychosocially oriented programs in which both the family and the TBI family member participate (Forssmann-Falck & Christian, 1989; Rosenthal, 1989). Second, in line with the promising results of Prigatano et al. (1984) and Rattok et al. (1992), rehabilitation needs to be holistic; that is, it needs to target a wide range of areas of functioning (e.g., social, family, behavioral, emotional, and cognitive), using a variety of techniques (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, vocational counseling, cognitive compensation). Third, contact with services needs to reflect the longterm nature of TBI sequelae (e.g., Thomsen, 1984) and thus be provided for several years after injury. Fourth, careful attention needs to be paid to the requirements of those living in rural areas where rehabilitation services are frequently either not available or difficult to access (C. Evans & Skidmore, 1989).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Family Support Traumatic Brain Injury Patient Consumer Satisfaction National Adult Reading Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Margaret Smith
    • 1
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations