Enhancing Emotional Adjustment

  • Louise Margaret Smith
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Many individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their family members experience some form of adverse emotional reaction such as anxiety, depression, grief, or low self-esteem following the injury (Brooks et al., 1986; Tyerman & Humphrey, 1984). These adverse emotional reactions are not surprising, given the large number of adjustments that TBI individuals and their families face. This chapter describes the approach taken in the family support program to enhance emotional adjustment following TBI. The interventions employed in the program are primarily based on the Prigatano (1987a) model, in which reactive responses (e.g., depression, irritability), neuropsychological factors (e.g., impulsivity), and long-standing characterological styles (e.g., dependency) are all seen to impact upon the TBI individual’s personality and emotional functioning. According to Prigatano’s model, the choice of intervention is then guided by whether the problem is primarily reactionary, neuropsychological, or characterological. For instance, reactionary-type adverse emotional reactions are addressed within a psychotherapeutic mode, rather than being treated with psychotropic medication. Similarly, neuropsychological problems are managed using environmental modification or cognitive coping strategies, rather than psychotherapy (Prigatano, 1986).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Traumatic Brain Injury Patient Neuropsychological Impairment Posttraumatic Amnesia Emotional Adjustment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Margaret Smith
    • 1
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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