Compensating for Cognitive Impairment

  • Louise Margaret Smith
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Cognitive impairment represents a major barrier to vocational, emotional, and interpersonal functioning for many individuals affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). For example, it may be difficult to obtain a job if one is unable to formulate a plan for locating vacant positions. Similarly, it may be an onerous task to maintain friendships when one cannot remember the content of conversations. In fact, the successful completion of many activities of daily living require the very cognitive skills that are impaired following TBI. Family members are affected by a TBI victim’s cognitive impairment as they grapple on a daily basis with the victim’s poor judgment, forgetfulness, and limited concentration span, which are frequent problems following TBI. The TBI victim may now require constant assistance from family members in the form of prompting to remember appointments, to locate lost objects, and to make decisions.

Keywords

Cognitive Impairment Traumatic Brain Injury Memory Impairment Executive Functioning Prospective Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Margaret Smith
    • 1
  • Hamish P. D. Godfrey
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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