Mixing

  • Narayan S. Tavare
Part of the The Springer Chemical Engineering Series book series (PCES)

Abstract

This chapter attempts a general and unifying treatment from a chemical reaction engineering viewpoint, in which the Lagrangian approach is used to describe mixing in a transport process primarily in continuous crystallizer systems. A rational approach to crystallizer description and design requires a solution of the relevant conservation equations representing crystal population and mass and energy balances, together with a description of the kinetics of rate processes involved and a definition of flow patterns within the vessels. The performance of a crystallizer system depends not only on the pertinent intrinsic kinetics of growth and nucleation processes, but also on the physical processes occurring in the vessel (Figure 102).

Keywords

Plug Flow Draft Tube Feed Stream Residence Time Distribution Crystal Size Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Narayan S. Tavare
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST)ManchesterUK

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