Current Trends in Adolescent Health

  • C. Wayne Sells
  • Robert Wm. Blum
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Over the past three decades, there have been two major demographic shifts among those in the second decade of life. Since the adolescent population (10 to 19 years of age) peaked in 1976 as a consequence of the postwar “baby boom,” the population of young people declined steadily at a rate of approximately 2% per year until 1985. However, in the years between 1985 and 1991, the decline slowed to only 2% over that entire period (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1993; Hollmann, 1993). In 1992, there were over 35 million young people between the ages of 10 and 19 in the United States, representing 14% of the population (Hollmann, 1993). Over the past few years, the decline has reversed; and by 2020, there will be 43 million teenagers in the United States (Figure 1) (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1993; Hollmann, 1993; Campbell, 1994).

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa Adolescent Health Smokeless Tobacco 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Wayne Sells
    • 1
  • Robert Wm. Blum
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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