The Role of Adenosine A2a Receptors in Regulating Gabaergic Synaptic Transmission in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

  • Akihisa Mori
  • Tomomi Shindou
  • Michio Ichimura
  • Hiromi Nonaka
  • Hiroshi Kase
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 47)

Abstract

There is growing evidence that adenosine is a potent inhibitor of neuronal activity in the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems. Four major subtypes of adenosine receptors, A1 A2a, A2b, and A3, have been characterized (see review by Abbracchio et al., 1993). Among them, only A1 receptors have been known to serve to modulate synaptic transmission in the mammalian CNS. In contrast to the widespread distribution of the A1 and A2b receptor in brain, A2a receptors appear to be confined to the striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle (Jarvis and Williams, 1989; Parkinson and Fredholm, 1990; Martinez-Mir et al., 1991).

Keywords

Medium Spiny Neuron Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Receptor Selective Agonist GABAergic Synaptic Transmission IPSC Amplitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akihisa Mori
    • 1
  • Tomomi Shindou
    • 1
  • Michio Ichimura
    • 1
  • Hiromi Nonaka
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kase
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmaceutical Research LaboratoriesKyowa Hakko Kogyo Co., Ltd.Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411Japan

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