PAF Receptor Anchors Streptococcus Pneumoniae to Activated Human Endothelial Cells

  • Diana R. Cundell
  • Craig Gerard
  • Ilona Idanpaan-Heikkila
  • Elaine I. Tuomanen
  • Norma P. Gerard
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 416)

Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram positive bacteria that is a major cause of pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis1. In contrast to the severity of invasive disease, ~40% of individuals harbor pneumococcus asymptomatically in the nasopharynx2. Further, it has long been recognized that the mere presence of pneumococci in the pulmonary alveolus does not infer progression to pneumonia3,4. These disparate courses suggest that as yet unknown elements of the encounter between host and pathogen determine the outcome. A clinical clue to the nature of these elements is the observation of the propensity of patients and experimental animals to progress to bacterial pneumonia in the context of an intercurrent upper respiratory tract viral infection5. Taken together with the recent observation that pneumococci have been shown to adhere in greater numbers to virally infected cells in vitro6, we hypothesized a change from a state of simple bacterial binding to the surface of the nasopharyngeal or pulmonary epithelium to a state promoting translocation across underlying endothelial cells into the blood stream in the context of an inflammatory stimulus.

Keywords

Streptococcus Pneumoniae Adherent Bacterium Human Vascular Endothelial Cell Flag Epitope Pneumococcal Carrier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Burman, LA, Norrby, R, Trollfors, B. (1985) Invasive pneumococcal infections: incidence, predisposing factors, and prognosis. Rev. Infect. Dis. 7, 133–142.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Austrian, R. (1986) Some aspects of the pneumococcal carrier state. J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 18, 35–45.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Vial, WC, Toews, GB, Pierce, AK. (1984) Early pulmonary granulocyte recruitment in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 129, 87–91.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hamburger, M, Robertson, 0. (1940) Studies of the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcus pneumoniae in the dog. J. Exp. Med. 72, 261–274.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Plotowski, M-C, Puchelle, E, Beck, G, Jacquot, J, Hannoun, C. (1986) Adherence of type I Streptococcus pneumoniae to tracheal epithelium of mice infected with influenza A/PR8 virus. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 134, 1040–1044.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hakansson, A, Kidd, A, Wadell, G, Sabharwal, H, Svanborg, C. (1994) Adenovirus infection enhances in vitro adhrence of Streptococus pneumoniae. Infect. Immun. 62, 2707–2714.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Cundell, DR, Gerard, NP, Gerard, C, Idanpaan-Heikkila, I, Tuomanen, EI. (1995) Streptococcus pneumoniae anchors to activated human cells by the receptor for platelet-activating factor. Nature 377, 435–438.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Cundell, DR, Tuomanen, El. (1994) Receptor specificity of adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to type I1 pneumocytes and vascular endothelial cells in vitro. Microb. Pathol. 17, 361–374.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Cabellos, C, Maclntyre, DE, Forrest, M, Burroughs, M, Prasad, S, Tuomanen, EI. (1992) Differing roles for platelet-activating factor during inflammation of the lung and subarachnoid space. The spacial case of Streptococcus pneumoniae. J. Clin. Invest. 90, 612–618.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wissner, A, Schaub, RE, Sum, PE, Kohler, CA, Goldstein, BM. (1986) Analogues of platelet-activating factor: some modifications of the phosphorylcholine moiety. J. Med. Chem. 29, 328–333.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Kunz, D, Gerard, NP, Gerard, C. (1992) The human leukocyte platelet-activating factor receptor. J. Biol. Chem. 267, 9101–9106.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Shirasaki, H, Nishikawa, M, Adcock, IM, Mak, JC, Sakamoro, T, Shimuzu, T, Barnes, P. (1994) Expression of platelet-activating factor receptor mRNA in human and guinea pig lung. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biiol. 10, 533–537.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Gerard, NP, Gerard, C. (1994) Receptor-dependent internalization of platelet-activating factor. J. Immunol. 152, 793–800.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Rodriguez, CG, Cundell, DR, Tuomanen, EI, Kolakowski, LF, Gerard, C, Gerard, NP. (1995) The role of N-glycosylation for functional expression of the human PAF receptor: Glycosylation is required for efficient membrane trafficking. J. Biol. Chem. (in press).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Amatruda, TT, Gerard, NP, Gerard, C, Simon, MI. (1993) Specific interactions of chemoattractant receptors with G-proteins. J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10139–10144.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diana R. Cundell
    • 1
  • Craig Gerard
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ilona Idanpaan-Heikkila
    • 1
  • Elaine I. Tuomanen
    • 1
  • Norma P. Gerard
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular Infectious DiseasesRockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Ina Sue Perlmutter Laboratory and Department of Pediatrics Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.The Department of MedicineBeth Israel and Brigham and Women’s HospitalsBostonUSA
  4. 4.The Center for Blood Research and the Thorndike Laboratory of Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations