Effects of Antioxidant Vitamin and Trace Element Supplementation on Selenium Status in Healthy Subjects

Results of a SU.VI.MAX Pre-Test
  • P. Preziosi
  • J. Arnaud
  • P. Galan
  • A.-M. Roussel
  • M.-J. Richard
  • D. Malvy
  • A. Paul-Dauphin
  • S. Briancon
  • A. Favier
  • S. Hercberg

Abstract

Antioxidant functions have been associated with decreased DNA damage, diminished lipid peroxidation and inhibited malignant transformation in vitro (1,2); further, they are associated epidemiologically, with a lower incidence of certain types of cancer and degenerative diseases such as ischemic heart disease and cataracts (3–5). Recently, nutritional surveys showed that a significant percentage of the affluent world population has a relatively low intake or borderline vitamin and/or trace element status. The SU.VI.MAX study was designed to quantify the preventive effect of a combination of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements (beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium and zinc), in doses considered to be nutritional and non-pharmacological in terms of the incidence of cancer, heart disease, cataracts, infection and morbidity in a large adult population representative of an industrialized country (France). A randomized double-blind intervention trial involving these nutrients was undertaken over the course of 8 years. In preparing the SU.VI.MAX protocol, a pre-test was performed to assess the biological response to a 6 months supplementation with nutritional doses of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements.

Keywords

Selenium Concentration Serum Zinc Antioxidant Vitamin Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Serum Selenium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Preziosi
    • 1
  • J. Arnaud
    • 2
  • P. Galan
    • 1
  • A.-M. Roussel
    • 2
  • M.-J. Richard
    • 2
  • D. Malvy
    • 3
  • A. Paul-Dauphin
    • 4
  • S. Briancon
    • 4
  • A. Favier
    • 2
  • S. Hercberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut Scientifique et Technique de la Nutrition et l’AlimentationConservatoire National des Arts et MétiersParisFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire de BiochimieCHRU de GrenobleFrance
  3. 3.Labo Santé PubliqueCHRU de ToursFrance
  4. 4.Ecole de Santé PubliqueCHRU de NancyFrance

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