Ocean Pulse pp 17-29 | Cite as

Fish as a Foodstuff—a Catch 22

Is Aquaculture a Solution?
  • John Loret

Abstract

The destruction of fisheries world-wide can be traced to distinction of coastal habitats, polluting of spawning grounds and nursery areas and loss of near-shore wetlands, unrestricted coastal development and inadequate law enforcement. But the major cause by far is over exploitation of natural fisheries stocks. With modern technology and sophisticated gear there are currently 1.2 million large vessels hunting fewer and fewer fish. Since 1990 China has led the world in fishing production. In 1995, their fishing output was 25.2 million metric tons or, one fourth of the total world production. Throughout China the booming aquaculture industry is producing 53% of this aquatic production, employing fishery enhancement to closed cycle cultivation techniques.1 Returning from a recent invitation to visit aquaculture facilities and fish farms in northern and central China, it is clearly obvious as to why they are leading in this fast developing industry. This paper will discuss the problems of aquaculturing our foodstuffs from the sea (see Figures 1 through 12 on the Chinese aquaculture effort).

Keywords

Fish Catch Total World Production World Aquaculture Society Catfish Farmer Squid Jigging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Loret
    • 1
  1. 1.Science Museum of Long IslandPlandomeUSA

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