Moral and Ethical Considerations in Geropsychology

  • Michael Lavin
  • Bruce D. Sales
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

Most psychologists will have acquired a working familiarity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (1992) (hereinafter referred to as Ethics Code or Code) in the course of their professional education. They may know, for example, that the Code includes an introduction, an explanatory preamble, a set of six aspirational principles relating to competence, integrity, professional and scientific responsibility, respect for people’s rights and dignity, concern for the welfare of others, and social responsibility, and that these principles are followed by eight sections of ethical standards by which members of the American Psychological Association are bound. These standards cover general issues, testing, advertising, therapy, privacy and confidentiality, teaching, research, and publication, forensics, and resolving ethical issues. Although the aspirational principles of the association are not binding, they can be used to help interpret the binding standards. If psychologists who are members of the American Psychological Association fail to abide by the standards, then an ethics complaint can be brought to the association, and the association’s Ethics Committee’s Rules and Procedures (1992) will govern the quasi-legal proceedings that follow a complaint.

Keywords

Elderly Person American Psychological Association Ethic Code Decisional Capacity Risky Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Lavin
    • 1
  • Bruce D. Sales
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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