Existential-Phenomenological Research

  • Rolf von Eckartsberg

Abstract

There are two general approaches or orientations to research in existential-phenomenological psychology: empirical and hermeneutical-phenomenological. This chapter will examine each of these in turn.

Keywords

Fundamental Structure Steel Building Descriptive Protocol Situate Structure Fundamental Description 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rolf von Eckartsberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Late of Department of PsychologyDuquesne UniversityPittsburghUSA

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