The Three Mechanisms of Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, And Radiation

  • Octave Levenspiel
Part of the The Plenum Chemical Engineering Series book series (PCES)

Abstract

In general, heat flows from here to there by three distinct mechanisms:
  • by conduction, or the transfer of energy from matter to adjacent matter by direct contact, without intermixing or flow of any material.

  • by convection, or the transfer of energy by the bulk mixing of clumps of material. In natural convection it is the difference in density of hot and cold fluid which causes the mixing. In forced convection a mechanical agitator or an externally imposed pressure difference (by fan or compressor) causes the mixing.

  • by radiation such as light, infrared, ultraviolet and radio waves which emanate from a hot body and are absorbed by a cooler body.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Heat Transfer Coefficient Natural Convection View Factor Entry Length 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References and Related Readings

Conduction

  1. E. F. Adiutori, The New Heat Transfer, Venturo, Cincinnati (1974).Google Scholar
  2. W. H. McAdams, Heat Transmission, Third Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York (1954).Google Scholar
  3. J. R. Welty, Engineering Heat Transfer, Second Ed., Wiley, New York (1978).Google Scholar

Convection

  1. J. S. M. Botterill, “Fluidized Bed Behavior,” in Fluidized Beds, Combustion and Applications (J. R. Howard ed.), Applied Science, New York (1983).Google Scholar
  2. V. Cavaseno, ed., Process Heat Exchange, pp. 20, 101, 130, 140, McGraw-Hill, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  3. W. M. Kays and M. E. Crawford, Conuectiue Heat and Mass Transfer, Second Ed., Chapter 8, McGraw-Hill, New York (1980).Google Scholar
  4. D. Kunii and O. Levenspiel, Fluidization Engineering, Krieger, Melbourne, FL (1979).Google Scholar
  5. D. Kunii and O. Levenspiel, Fluidization Engineering, Second Ed., Butterworth, Boston, MA (1991).Google Scholar
  6. W. H. McAdams, Heat Transmission, Third Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York (1954).Google Scholar
  7. R. H. Perry and C. H. Chilton, Chemical Engineers’ Handbook, Fifth Ed., Sec. 10, McGraw-Hill, New York (1973); Sixth Ed., Sec. 10 (1984).Google Scholar
  8. W. E. Ranz and W. R. Marshall, Jr., Evaporation from drops, Chem. Eng. Prog. 48, 141 (1952).Google Scholar
  9. H. C. Hottel, Radiant heat transmission, Mech. Eng. 52, 699 (1930).Google Scholar
  10. H. C. Hottel and A. F. Sarofim, Radiative Transfer, McGraw-Hill, New York (1967).Google Scholar
  11. M. Jakob, Heat Transfer, Vol. 2, Wiley, New York (1957).Google Scholar
  12. W. H. McAdams, Heat Transmission, Third Ed., Chapter 4, McGraw-Hill, New York (1954).Google Scholar
  13. M. Siegel and J. R. Howell, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, Second Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York (1981).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Octave Levenspiel
    • 1
  1. 1.Oregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

Personalised recommendations