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Development of a Marker of Estrogenic Exposure in Breast Cancer Patients

  • Patricia Pazos
  • Pilar Pérez
  • Ana Rivas
  • Rafael Nieto
  • Begoña Botella
  • Jorge Crespo
  • Fátima Olea-Serrano
  • Mariana F. Fernández
  • José Expósito
  • Nicolás Olea
  • Vicente Pedraza
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 444)

Abstract

The effort to develop markers of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) is a response to demands by the public and regulatory agencies for the evaluation of the role of these hormonal xenobiotics in human health (Sonnenschein et al., 1995). Exposure to EDC occurs mainly through diet but also in an occupational setting. For example, organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls enter the human organism via food and water but they also may accede to humans, mainly those professionally exposed, by inhalation and contact. Many of these organochlorine derivatives accumulate in fat tissues because of their solubility in lipids and inefficient metabolism. It is acknowledged that the environmental accumulation of organochlorines has been decreasing since 1970 in Europe and the USA but that human body burden has decreased at a slower rate (Furst et al., 1994).

Keywords

Breast Cancer High Performance Liquid Chromatography Breast Cancer Patient Organochlorine Pesticide Electron Capture Detector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Pazos
    • 1
  • Pilar Pérez
    • 1
  • Ana Rivas
    • 1
  • Rafael Nieto
    • 1
  • Begoña Botella
    • 2
  • Jorge Crespo
    • 2
  • Fátima Olea-Serrano
    • 2
  • Mariana F. Fernández
    • 1
  • José Expósito
    • 3
  • Nicolás Olea
    • 1
  • Vicente Pedraza
    • 1
  1. 1.Lab. Medical Investigations, Department of RadiologyUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain
  2. 2.Department. Nutrition and Food SciencesUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain
  3. 3.Service of RadiotherapyVirgen de las Nieves HospitalGranadaSpain

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